Pre-Conference Courses

Pre-conference courses will be offered on Sunday, August 18, 2019 at Žalgirio Arena. These courses may be eligible for Continuing Education credits for many professional societies. If you wish to attend a course, please note that there is limited space available for each and that some of the programs run concurrently.

Course times are subject to change. You will be notified of any changes to the schedule. Courses may be cancelled due to lack of participation. If a cancellation does occur, your workshop/course registration will be refunded.

Morning Courses
8:30 am to 12:30 pm

Afternoon Courses
1:30 pm to 5:30 pm

Full Day Courses
9:00 am to 5:30 pm

Effectively communicating risk assessment messages by visualizing uncertainty

Exposure to UFPs emitted from cooking using gas and electric stoves: What we need to know about the PM emission rate and its health effects, and opportunities for future studies

High-throughput Exposure Assessment of chemicals in consumer products for chemical prioritization, risk screening, substitution and life cycle impact assessment – Theory and practical examples

Developing protocol for monitoring of pollutants from gas based cooking and associated health risks: Focus on urban microenvironments of developing countries

REACH exposure models and TREXMO. How to deal with different exposure predictions and to conduct reliable exposure assessments.

Pre-Conference Course Fees

Half-Day Courses

Early bird registration
through June 24

Regular registration
June 25 - August 9

Onsite registration
starting August 10

ISES/ISIAQ Member

$75.00 USD

$95.00 USD

$110.00 USD

Student/Developing Country/Retiree

$45.00 USD

$50.00 USD

$60.00 USD

Non-Member

$95.00 USD

$115.00 USD

$125.00 USD

Full-Day Courses

Early bird registration
through June 24

Regular registration
June 25 - August 9

Onsite registration
starting August 10

ISES/ISIAQ Member

$125.00 USD

$145.00 USD

$160.00 USD

Student/Developing Country/Retiree

$65.00 USD

$70.00 USD

$80.00 USD

Non-Member

$145.00 USD

$165.00 USD

$175.00 USD

Course Descriptions

Click on the course titles for details

Specific learning objectives: This workshop will focus on two tools developed for uncertainty analysis of both hazard and exposure aspects with a visual depiction of risk assessment results.

Speakers:
Jennifer Foreman, ExxonMobil Biomedical Science, Inc.
Martine Bakker, RIVM

Target Audience: Exposure scientists, toxicologists, human health risk assessment technical experts, chemical risk managers and communicators. Basic knowledge on Microsoft Excel is required.

Skills and Knowledge the Audience Will Gain: Provide workshop registrants with a general background, access and hands-on training on the uncertainty visualization tools through case studies.

Preparation: The participants are asked to bring their own laptops. The Uncertainty Visualization in Risk Assessment tool is a web based application, which requires the Google Chrome web browser for functionality. APROBA-Plus requires Microsoft Excel 2010 (version 14) or higher. The APROBA-Plus tool will be distributed prior to the training course.

Objective:The objective of this half‐day course is to provide participants with interactive training on newly developed tools for communicating uncertainty in chemical risk assessments, namely a web based application for Uncertainty Visualization in Risk Assessment and APROBA-Plus tool developed by RIVM1. The former tool is an extension of and web application for the semi quantitative method described in Beck et al 2016 and depicted in Table 9 of that publication2. The latter tool is an extension of the APROBA tool developed under the WHO IPCS Harmonization Project on uncertainty in hazard assessment3. Having a clear and understandable manner to communicate the uncertainty in chemical risk assessments (RA) is essential for transparency and credibility in risk management decision making. Without an understanding of the uncertainties incorporated into a RA decision makers, risk managers, or the public are unable to make judgments of how to use the information provided. Additionally, clear documentation of the uncertainty that was accounted for in an assessment allows for scientific dialogue and better understanding of what data could be generated to improve the precision of the assessment. Tools visualizing the uncertainty in the assessed risk offer promise as an improved means of communicating and conveying uncertainty to regulatory decision makers, risk managers, and the public.

Speakers: Nivedita Kaul, Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology Sumit Khandelwal, Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology Specific learning objectives: The aim of the course is to enable the audience to develop methodology and protocol:
  • To conduct monitoring for cooking generated pollutants like NOX, PM, CO etc. in different cooking microenvironments like domestic and commercial kitchens.
  • To conduct health survey of cooks and non-cooks using questionnaires, spirometery, pulse oximetery and other techniques to assess health risk due to exposure to indoor air pollutants.
  • To investigate the role of cooking practices in elevated concentrations of various pollutants.
  • To assess the role of efficacy of ventilation and its importance in dispersion of pollutants to other areas of the building.
Skills and Knowledge the Audience Will Gain:
  • Monitoring protocol for cooking generated pollutants in actual kitchens.
  • Methodology for exposure assessment for cooks and non-cooks.
  • Best cooking practices to alleviate production and accumulation of indoor air pollutants.
  • Effective ventilation design for flushing out of cooking generated pollutants
Objective: Pollutant exposure during gas based cooking can be regarded as one of the most important environmental and public health concerns in urban areas of developing countries. Although considered cleaner as compared to solid fuels, gas cooking (using liquefied petroleum gas, LPG; natural gas etc.) emits significant concentration of fine particles, NOX, CO and various organic compounds in the indoor air. The importance of exposure to indoor air pollutants is highlighted by the efforts of the World Health Organization (WHO) to harmonize methods of evaluation of household air pollution and health across settings so that health impacts are assessed consistently and rigorously. This course is an attempt to educate the audience to develop methods and protocols to monitor the conditions of different settings on a regular basis to assess the impact of the efforts of WHO and governments in addressing the problems faced by the exposed population especially women and children.The outline of a half-day course comprising of four sessions of about one hour each has been given below. Session 1: Introduction
  • Types of pollutants
  • Origin and dispersion of pollutants in kitchens
  • Associated health risks
  • Extent of problem in developing countries especially Asian countries
Session 2: Monitoring protocol
  • Methods to carry out monitoring for various pollutants
  • Instruments required
  • Methods of selecting sampling cohort including women and children
  • Making decision on questionnaire to be used
  • Various observations required during monitoring
  • Sampling protocol
  • Fine points to be considered
  • Monitoring ethics
Session 3: Effective presentation of data and meaningful interpretation of results
  • Analysis of data using statistical tools like SPSS
  • Interpretation of results using data mining techniques
  • Box plots, Removing outliers
  • Effect of confounding factors
  • Interpretation and analysis using mean, standard deviation, moving averages etc.
Session 4: The way forward
  • How to make recommendation on the basis of results
  • Ways to improve the practices/provisions for better indoor environment
  • Preparing/suggesting guidelines for alleviation of the issues observed
  • Observations related to health effects to be addressed
  • Creating awareness
Speakers: Nivedita Kaul, Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology Sumit Khandelwal, Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology Specific learning objectives: The aim of the course is to enable the audience to develop methodology and protocol:
  • To conduct monitoring for cooking generated pollutants like NOX, PM, CO etc. in different cooking microenvironments like domestic and commercial kitchens.
  • To conduct health survey of cooks and non-cooks using questionnaires, spirometery, pulse oximetery and other techniques to assess health risk due to exposure to indoor air pollutants.
  • To investigate the role of cooking practices in elevated concentrations of various pollutants.
  • To assess the role of efficacy of ventilation and its importance in dispersion of pollutants to other areas of the building.
Skills and Knowledge the Audience Will Gain:
  • Monitoring protocol for cooking generated pollutants in actual kitchens.
  • Methodology for exposure assessment for cooks and non-cooks.
  • Best cooking practices to alleviate production and accumulation of indoor air pollutants.
  • Effective ventilation design for flushing out of cooking generated pollutants
Objective: Pollutant exposure during gas based cooking can be regarded as one of the most important environmental and public health concerns in urban areas of developing countries. Although considered cleaner as compared to solid fuels, gas cooking (using liquefied petroleum gas, LPG; natural gas etc.) emits significant concentration of fine particles, NOX, CO and various organic compounds in the indoor air. The importance of exposure to indoor air pollutants is highlighted by the efforts of the World Health Organization (WHO) to harmonize methods of evaluation of household air pollution and health across settings so that health impacts are assessed consistently and rigorously. This course is an attempt to educate the audience to develop methods and protocols to monitor the conditions of different settings on a regular basis to assess the impact of the efforts of WHO and governments in addressing the problems faced by the exposed population especially women and children.The outline of a half-day course comprising of four sessions of about one hour each has been given below. Session 1: Introduction
  • Types of pollutants
  • Origin and dispersion of pollutants in kitchens
  • Associated health risks
  • Extent of problem in developing countries especially Asian countries
Session 2: Monitoring protocol
  • Methods to carry out monitoring for various pollutants
  • Instruments required
  • Methods of selecting sampling cohort including women and children
  • Making decision on questionnaire to be used
  • Various observations required during monitoring
  • Sampling protocol
  • Fine points to be considered
  • Monitoring ethics
Session 3: Effective presentation of data and meaningful interpretation of results
  • Analysis of data using statistical tools like SPSS
  • Interpretation of results using data mining techniques
  • Box plots, Removing outliers
  • Effect of confounding factors
  • Interpretation and analysis using mean, standard deviation, moving averages etc.
Session 4: The way forward
  • How to make recommendation on the basis of results
  • Ways to improve the practices/provisions for better indoor environment
  • Preparing/suggesting guidelines for alleviation of the issues observed
  • Observations related to health effects to be addressed
  • Creating awareness

Speakers:
Nenad Savic, Institute for Work and Health

Specific learning objectives:

  • Students will gain an overall understanding of the differences between the exposure models under REACH
  • To conduct health survey of cooks and non-cooks using questionnaires, spirometery, pulse oximetery and other techniques to assess health risk due to exposure to indoor air pollutants.
  • Understand the backgrounds and benefits of using the TREXMO tool
  • Learn how to enter exposure information in TREXMO, perform the necessary parameter translations, and interpret the different outcomes
  • Students will learn about the upcoming TREXMO+ model, its backgrounds, performances, and different ways how it can be applied for exposure assessment
Outline: 

Background (30 Minutes): It is intended to cover the structure, development, and the mathematics behind the exposure calculations of several REACH models. A focus will be also on the main differences in their structure, the between-model variability and the between-user variabilities.

TREXMO (60 minutes): The TREXMO tool includes six exposure models, which are inter-linked with a parameter translation system. Before using TREXMO, it is essential to understand how this translation system works and what translation outcomes can be expected. The other important aspect of TREXMO that will be covered is the interpretation of the obtained prediction. Since TREXMO provides six different exposure estimates, the correct interpretation of these results is important to draw reliable conclusions.
 
Practical demonstration (60 Minutes): Several real-world exposure situations will be presented to the students. Their content and the difficulties with the data interpretation into the models’ parameters will be demonstrated. The exposure situations will be used to perform exposure assessments in tools, such as ART, Stoffenmanger and ECOTOC TRAv3. Finally, the given exposure situations will be re-evaluated within the framework of TREXMO.
 
TREXMO+ (60 minutes): Recently developed model, TREXMO+, uses an advanced algorithm that combines the estimates of three existing REACH models to provide estimates that are more accurate. Its concept, the structure of algorithm, and evaluated performance will be presented to the students.
 
Conclusion and Outlook (30 Minutes): Based on the provided information during this session, conclusions will be drawn on the strengths and weaknesses of the presented exposure models. The future goals and the directions of development of TREXMO will also be shortly discussed.

Speakers:
Peter Fantke, Associate Professor, Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark
Olivier Jolliet, Professor, School of Public Health, University of Michigan

Abstracts: There is an increasing need for quantitatively assessing exposure to chemicals in consumer product applications for chemical prioritization, risk screening, substitution and life cycle impact assessment. This course provides a practical overview of the mass-balance based high-throughput tools to assess multi-pathway human exposure to chemicals in consumer products, and how to integrate these tools with high-throughput dose-response modelling based on comparative and quantitative metrics. We begin by explaining the assessment framework and basic concepts of mass balance modelling – including multiple transfers between near- and far-field environmental compartments. We next present the fundamentals of the multi-pathway resulting exposures for consumers and the general population, reviewing the high-throughput data and models available for detergents, building materials, food contact materials and personal care products. We will illustrate how the risks and impacts associated with consumer exposure can be evaluated in different contexts using a consistent set of dose-response information. We then guide the participants through examples developing exposure and impact factors for various exposure scenarios. We will conclude with a discussion of how this framework fills in important gaps in current assessments and how it can be used in various science-policy fields, including the prioritization and ranking of chemicals, chemical substitution and life cycle toxicity characterization.

Specific Learning Objectives: The aim of this course is to introduce participants to quantitative exposure assessment methods suitable for alternatives assessment, life cycle impact assessment and comparative risk assessment. Participants will learn to use and evaluate mass-balance tools for assessing various exposure pathways, using the product intake fraction relating chemical mass intake to chemical mass in a products. Participants will work with practical examples. The course is intended for environmental science practitioners interested in the scientific fundamentals of exposure and impact assessment of chemicals for a broad range of consumer products. Only basic background knowledge of environmental modelling, risk assessment or life cycle impact assessment is considered necessary. Participants will gain knowledge of basic concepts of exposure science for the impact assessment of chemicals in products and be able to apply the modelling framework and interpret results.:

Products/Course Materials: Short course copies of all lecture presentation slides as well as working materials for the exercises will be distributed electronically. A copy of all presented exposure modelling tools will be distributed.

Outline: 

Morning session (09:00 – 13:00)
09:00 – 09:15 Introduction: Exposure to chemicals in products in different contexts
09:15 – 10:45 Product intake fraction and high-throughput exposure matrix framework
10:45 – 11:00 Coffee Break
11:00 – 12:00 Data and models for detergents, building and food contact materials, and personal care products
12:00 – 13:00 Exercise on data and models for different products
13:00 – 13:30 Lunch break

Afternoon session (13:30 – 17:30)
13:30 – 15:00 Application case I: Consumer exposure in substitution and impact assessment: building materials
15:00 – 15:15 Coffee Break
15:15 – 16:45 Application case II: Consumer exposure in risk screening: personal care products
16:45 – 17:15 Discussion: Interpretation and open questions
17:15 – 17:30 Course evaluation

 
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